Serverless promises and the persistent need for critical alerting

critical alerting and serverless computing

Why serverless computing doesn’t end the need for security or alerts Serverless computing provides the advantage of taking away the problem of managing servers. For many small start-ups, this is a huge advantage as the cost of purchasing, maintaining and scaling servers is a real pain point. Serverless also holds forth the prospect of ending the need for Ops as we know it, ending the need for security worries and ending the need for being on-call. But, while this modern-day DevOps marvel known as serverless might seem like a panacea, serverless computing needs to come with a healthy dose of reality. The reality of serverless In an article I recently posted to DZone entitled How Smart Is Serverless, I question how smart it is to outsource your security concerns to a third party like AWS. As I note in the article, you cannot abstract security without facing some pretty scary consequences. Amichai […] Read more »

Why Serverless Still Needs Critical Alerting

critical alerting with serverless

NoOps eschews critical alerting at its own peril Many start-ups’ embrace serverless architectures such as AWS, believing they will be able to adopt NoOps. NoOps means no worries about servers as everything is on the cloud and if there are no worries about servers then there is no need to worry about critical alerting. The reality is slightly different. No matter how minimized Ops becomes, there will always be a need for strong incident management applications. The emphasis will simply further push monitoring from an Ops-only role to an important role for everyone on the development team. What is NoOps and why is there so much criticism? NoOps defines an IT environment that is so automated and abstracted from the underlying infrastructure that there is no need for a dedicated team to manage Ops in-house. The two main drivers behind NoOps are increasing IT automation and cloud computing. Even among […] Read more »